Forex 1-2-3 Strategy - Price Action Strategy Explained ...

Forex Trading Strategy: How I Turned $3,500 to $127,000+ in Less Than 2 Months

Forex Trading Strategy: How I Turned $3,500 to $127,000+ in Less Than 2 Months submitted by emmaclandon to u/emmaclandon [link] [comments]

This Random strategy broke even trading Forex every 15 minutes for a month.

New to Algo trading, and just learning and experimenting.

I'm posting this more because I found it to be interesting, though I wonder if anyone could suggest one small change to give this an edge slightly above break-even. (One old weird trick the algorithms don't want you to know!?)
I realize that 1 month isn't much time at all, but this thing traded every 15 minutes, 24/5.

Results: Break-even, after fluctuating +/- 10% several times throughout.

Parameters:

I thought this would waste my account in a big hurry, but I was pretty surprised at how well it did. Yeah, it isn't profitable, but for being totally random, I was not expecting it to break-even.
This experiment was inspired by the Incerto series by N. N. Taleb. (I should clarify- he doesn't advocate for trading this way, just reading so much about randomness got me interested in the experiment)

Here's a link to the actual script, for those interested.
https://pastebin.com/raw/Qwcr6hMG
submitted by rm-rf_iniquity to algotrading [link] [comments]

This Random strategy broke even trading Forex every 15 minutes for a month.

submitted by nadonet to StonkFeed [link] [comments]

forex trading strategies that work - forex trading simple strategies, i made $11000 in 3 months

forex trading strategies that work - forex trading simple strategies, i made $11000 in 3 months submitted by TradingStrategys to u/TradingStrategys [link] [comments]

After 9 months of obsession, here is my open source Node.js framework for backtesting forex trading strategies

TL;DR There's lots more to the story. But the code is all open source now. Have at it. I'm too exhausted to continue with this. If you'd like more details, feel free to message me. If you happen to carry on with this project or use any ideas from it, I would greatly appreciate it if you could keep in touch on your findings. If anyone has any insights, please feel free to comment or message me.
I've spent the last nine months working furiously on this. I started a project for backtesting strategies against data I exported from MetaTrader. I had a very powerful computer crunching numbers constantly, trying to find the most optimal configuration of strategy indicator inputs that would results in the highest win rate and profit possible.
Eventually, after talking with a data scientist, I realized my backtesting optimizer was suffering from something called overfitting. He then recommend using the k-fold cross-validation technique. So, I modified things (in the "k-fold" forex-backtesting branch), and in fact it provided very optimistic results when backtested against MetaTrader data (60 - 70% win rate for 3 years). However, I had collected 3 months of data from a trading site (by intercepting their Web Socket data), and when I performed validation tests against that data using the k-fold results created from the MetaTrader data, I only got a ~57% win rate or so. In order to break even with Binary Options trading, you need at least a 58% win rate. So in short, the k-fold optimization results produce a good result when validation tested against data exported from MetaTrader, but they do not produce a good result when validation tested against the trading site's data.
I have two theories on why this ended up not working with the trading site's data:
For the strategy I use the following indicators: SMA (Simple Moving Average), EMA (Exponential Moving Average), RSI (Relative Strength Index), Stochastic Oscillator, and Polynomial Regression Channel. forex-backtesting has an optimizer which tries hundreds of thousands of combinations of values for each of these indicators, combined, and saves the results to a MongoDB database. It can take days to run depending on how many configurations there are.
Basically the strategy tries to detect price reversals and trade with those. So if it "thinks" the price is going to go down within the next five minutes, it places a 5 minutes PUT trade. The Polynomial Regression Channel indicator is the most important indicator; if the price deviates outside the upper or lower value for this indicator (and other indicators meet their criteria for the strategy), then a trade is initiated. The optimizer tries to find the best values for the upper and lower values (standard deviations from the middle regression line).
Additionally, I think it might be best to enter trades at the 59th or 00th second of each minute. So I have used minute tick data for backtesting.
Also, I apologize that some of the code is messy. I tried to keep it clean but ended up hacking some of it in desperation toward the end :)
gulpfile.js is a good place to start as far as figuring out how to use the tools available. Look through the available tasks, and see how various "classes" are used ("classes" in quotes because ES5 doesn't have real class support).
The best branches to look at are "k-fold" and "master", and "validation".
One word of advice: never, ever create an account with Tradorax. They will call you every other day, provide very bad customer support, hang up the phone on you, and they will make it almost impossible to withdraw your money.
submitted by chaddjohnson to algotrading [link] [comments]

After 9 months of obsession, here is my open source Node.js framework for backtesting forex trading strategies [X-Post From /r/algotrading]

After 9 months of obsession, here is my open source Node.js framework for backtesting forex trading strategies [X-Post From /algotrading] submitted by serendipitybot to Serendipity [link] [comments]

Weekend offer expires soon! $15 - 1 month + 1 month bonus EXPRESS FOREX SIGNALS $50 - 1 year + 3 month bonus EXPRESS FOREX SIGNALS only $400 - #1 TRADING STRATEGY + 3 MONTH PRACTICE (avg. 7% profit daily, 96% accuracy)

Weekend offer expires soon! $15 - 1 month + 1 month bonus EXPRESS FOREX SIGNALS $50 - 1 year + 3 month bonus EXPRESS FOREX SIGNALS only $400 - #1 TRADING STRATEGY + 3 MONTH PRACTICE (avg. 7% profit daily, 96% accuracy) submitted by DailyProfit4Life to u/DailyProfit4Life [link] [comments]

Controlling Emotions

Hi there, I'm relatively new to trading and financial markets. For the past 3 months I've been on a demo account trading my analysis and implementation seems to be fairly accurate and reliable. Although the past 2 weeks I've been on a real account, My aim isn't to make a lot of money on this account it's more like a phase 2 of learning. My issue is that I make a trade, for example LONG GBPUSD, I then get scared and either cut the loss too fast or take profit too fast. Do I just overcome this by getting used to trading?
If anyone can provide any tips that would be much appreciated.

EDIT:
Thanks to everyone who commented somethings that have helped me:
Not constantly staring at my P&L
Writing out my plan, risk, targets, ideas and then reading my plan over when i'm in a drawdown.
Taking a break after a certain amount of wins

EDIT 2nd:

Just wanted to share another thing that I think helped me a lot.
Start of end of August - start of September, I lost 34% of my overall account. This was due to being scared. I've now regained the majority of my losses just by focusing and trying to stay calm. This was a big game change because it taught me even if I could lose that amount, my strategy works over the long term so I'll come out on top.
submitted by Careless-Ad6082 to Trading [link] [comments]

Double Supertrend Strategy Backtest (8500+ Trades on 28 Pairs)

Hi everyone, so a few months ago I discovered this post by u/AHoomanBeanz which is a strategy I've never heard of before. Basically, you have 2 Supertrends, a short-term one, and a long-term one and when both Supertrends go in the same direction you take a trade.
I took the liberty of modifying the strategy by setting fixed TPs instead of trailing SL with the short-term Supertrend. Check out his post for more info about entries, SL, etc.
In order to determine what way is the most efficient, I backtested this exact strategy on all 28 Majors and Minors and took five different approaches to TPs and moving of SL:
- 1:1 RRR, No Breakeven SL - 1:1.5 RRR, No BE SL - 1:2 RRR, No BE SL
- 1:1.5 RRR, Move SL to BE at 1:1 RRR - 1:2 RRR, Move SL to BE at 1:1RRR
There would be many other ways to handle the TPs and SLs but it already took me months to backtest this but if anyone wants to extend this backtest, feel free.

The Results
Using all 5 ways there were 8 out of 28 pairs that weren't profitable at all. (EURGBP, EURCAD, GBPAUD, GBPNZD, AUDCHF, NZDJPY, CADCHF, CHFJPY)
The remaining 20 pairs were profitable with at least one of the 5 ways. So I combined all 20 pairs and their most profitable TP/SL management methods and it turns out that the strategy isn't even that bad considering that you really just have to understand how Supertrends work.
Now here are some quick stats: Backtest Period: Jan 2017 - Aug 2020
- Risk Per Trade: 1% - Winrate: 44.66% - Profit Factor: 1.65 - Average Monthly Return: 5.81% - Max Drawdown: 18.4%

Notice that the drawdown is pretty high so if you're trading with a prop firm like FTMO you could just risk half as much (0.5% per trade) and your max DD would be 9.2%. Keep in mind that the return would also get cut in half.
If you want to get a more detailed view, here's the backtesting spreadsheet
(Before anyone asks: I spent 2-4h per day for around 6 weeks backtesting and tracking this stuff.)
submitted by FxRaHe to Forex [link] [comments]

People who regurgitate Warren Buffets Long Term Investing strategy over successful day trading are delusional here's why.

It bugs me when people say warren buffets idea of investing which is hold long term and put in sp500 and that you can't beat the 10% returns of the sp500. People don't realize that he is referring to people with HUGE CAPITAL. When you are working with 50k it's different than trading 50 million. I can very well make 15% in a month with 50k but would differently not be able to replicate that with a 50 million account. He even said it himself
"if I was running $1 million today, or $10 million for that matter, I’d be fully invested. Anyone who says that size does not hurt investment performance is selling. The highest rates of return I’ve ever achieved were in the 1950s. I killed the Dow. You ought to see the numbers. But I was investing peanuts then. It’s a huge structural advantage not to have a lot of money. I think I could make you 50% a year on $1 million. No, I know I could. I guarantee that.”
Then when I tell people I make 10% on 50k a month I get the stupid comments
"iF yoU MAke 10% a mOntH YoU wOulD be A BiiLlIonaire iN just 4 YeArS"
But it just doesn't work that way.
The magic of Buffett’s strategy is its ability to scale. When Buffett makes 20%, he can do it on $150 thousand or $150 million or $150 billion. This is not true for ordinary traders! And Defiantly not me.
My end goal is to reach a number in which when get there I would be fully retired because although day trading is definitely more free and rewarding than working a standard job at the end of day you are still working. Once I reach my end goal through real estate and yes Long term investing with sp500 I would be better off getting my 5- 10% annually on my main account than my day trading account 50k and making 7-10k a month until then I will day trade as its the most rewarding way I can make money and currently defiantly more the sp500 can make.
submitted by Greymatter1399 to Forex [link] [comments]

Hands on or hands off

Hi all. I am in a very difficult psychologically situation. I have studied for 7 years to be a day trader. Stare at the charts all day, actively manage, bla bla bla. So here is my struggle.
Off the bat, my goal is to one day be a full time forex trader with no other source of income
Recently I started reading off levels. I go in for 10m per day (while on the crapper in the morning) set up 20-30 alerts on my phone, and then just enter blindly for 1.5 rr during the day. I get about 60% strike rate, more than enough to be popping champagne and living the life. I get about 3-4 setups per day. That is option 1.
Option 1 downside is eventually I get a short like gbpusd this Monday, where I got in for 4 pip stop and could have trailed it for 15RR!
Option 2 is active trading. Sitting at the desk, charting out, following news events, the works. Taking positions, trailing stops to lock profits, the stress that goes with it.
I should be happy with option 1 but it keeps feeling wrong. As if I am cheating. It cannot be this easy, can it? Furthermore, if I go full time to only trade 10 mins per say and make 2-3 R almost every day, what will I do the rest of the time? I am one of those guys raised with the "you have to work hard around the clock" mentality, and I know that does not apply to Forex and trading at all. Nevertheless, 10m per day just feels and sounds weird, and I can't shake the feeling I will get a slap in the face for it. But I backtested. I forward tested. I have been trading it in a micro account for 2 months and it checks out.
Reddit, what is your opinion. Option 1 laid back, or go back to the grinder and do option 2
Edit : correcting typo
View Poll
submitted by crypthon to Forex [link] [comments]

Forex Principle

"Until you show you can handle what you've got, you won't get any more!"
Like, if you can't handle a $1,000 account, what makes you think you'll handle a $10K account? You'll still blow it..so take your time and you'll get there..
submitted by Leon_l_l to Forex [link] [comments]

Realistic expectations from Forex trading

I'm very into long term investment and FIRE. The people from those communities usually see trading as a sure way to lose money. Also, there are many self-proclaimed gurus that try to sell the idea that trading is easy and that you can quit your 9-5 job and live off trading in no time. In my eyes this sounds delusional and scammy. I'm very sceptical about making money with trading. I'd be fighting against investment banks whose budgets are counted in the millions; they can buy software and hardware and hire the best candidates to trade.
Do I really have a chance to make money consistently? If so, what's a realistic expected return? How much do you guys make per year, and how many years of experience do you have?
submitted by floressas1729 to Forex [link] [comments]

Former investment bank FX trader: Risk management part II

Former investment bank FX trader: Risk management part II
Firstly, thanks for the overwhelming comments and feedback. Genuinely really appreciated. I am pleased 500+ of you find it useful.
If you didn't read the first post you can do so here: risk management part I. You'll need to do so in order to make sense of the topic.
As ever please comment/reply below with questions or feedback and I'll do my best to get back to you.
Part II
  • Letting stops breathe
  • When to change a stop
  • Entering and exiting winning positions
  • Risk:reward ratios
  • Risk-adjusted returns

Letting stops breathe

We talked earlier about giving a position enough room to breathe so it is not stopped out in day-to-day noise.
Let’s consider the chart below and imagine you had a trailing stop. It would be super painful to miss out on the wider move just because you left a stop that was too tight.

Imagine being long and stopped out on a meaningless retracement ... ouch!
One simple technique is simply to look at your chosen chart - let’s say daily bars. And then look at previous trends and use the measuring tool. Those generally look something like this and then you just click and drag to measure.
For example if we wanted to bet on a downtrend on the chart above we might look at the biggest retracement on the previous uptrend. That max drawdown was about 100 pips or just under 1%. So you’d want your stop to be able to withstand at least that.
If market conditions have changed - for example if CVIX has risen - and daily ranges are now higher you should incorporate that. If you know a big event is coming up you might think about that, too. The human brain is a remarkable tool and the power of the eye-ball method is not to be dismissed. This is how most discretionary traders do it.
There are also more analytical approaches.
Some look at the Average True Range (ATR). This attempts to capture the volatility of a pair, typically averaged over a number of sessions. It looks at three separate measures and takes the largest reading. Think of this as a moving average of how much a pair moves.
For example, below shows the daily move in EURUSD was around 60 pips before spiking to 140 pips in March. Conditions were clearly far more volatile in March. Accordingly, you would need to leave your stop further away in March and take a correspondingly smaller position size.

ATR is available on pretty much all charting systems
Professional traders tend to use standard deviation as a measure of volatility instead of ATR. There are advantages and disadvantages to both. Averages are useful but can be misleading when regimes switch (see above chart).
Once you have chosen a measure of volatility, stop distance can then be back-tested and optimised. For example does 2x ATR work best or 5x ATR for a given style and time horizon?
Discretionary traders may still eye-ball the ATR or standard deviation to get a feeling for how it has changed over time and what ‘normal’ feels like for a chosen study period - daily, weekly, monthly etc.

Reasons to change a stop

As a general rule you should be disciplined and not change your stops. Remember - losers average losers. This is really hard at first and we’re going to look at that in more detail later.
There are some good reasons to modify stops but they are rare.
One reason is if another risk management process demands you stop trading and close positions. We’ll look at this later. In that case just close out your positions at market and take the loss/gains as they are.
Another is event risk. If you have some big upcoming data like Non Farm Payrolls that you know can move the market +/- 150 pips and you have no edge going into the release then many traders will take off or scale down their positions. They’ll go back into the positions when the data is out and the market has quietened down after fifteen minutes or so. This is a matter of some debate - many traders consider it a coin toss and argue you win some and lose some and it all averages out.
Trailing stops can also be used to ‘lock in’ profits. We looked at those before. As the trade moves in your favour (say up if you are long) the stop loss ratchets with it. This means you may well end up ‘stopping out’ at a profit - as per the below example.

The mighty trailing stop loss order
It is perfectly reasonable to have your stop loss move in the direction of PNL. This is not exposing you to more risk than you originally were comfortable with. It is taking less and less risk as the trade moves in your favour. Trend-followers in particular love trailing stops.
One final question traders ask is what they should do if they get stopped out but still like the trade. Should they try the same trade again a day later for the same reasons? Nope. Look for a different trade rather than getting emotionally wed to the original idea.
Let’s say a particular stock looked cheap based on valuation metrics yesterday, you bought, it went down and you got stopped out. Well, it is going to look even better on those same metrics today. Maybe the market just doesn’t respect value at the moment and is driven by momentum. Wait it out.
Otherwise, why even have a stop in the first place?

Entering and exiting winning positions

Take profits are the opposite of stop losses. They are also resting orders, left with the broker, to automatically close your position if it reaches a certain price.
Imagine I’m long EURUSD at 1.1250. If it hits a previous high of 1.1400 (150 pips higher) I will leave a sell order to take profit and close the position.
The rookie mistake on take profits is to take profit too early. One should start from the assumption that you will win on no more than half of your trades. Therefore you will need to ensure that you win more on the ones that work than you lose on those that don’t.

Sad to say but incredibly common: retail traders often take profits way too early
This is going to be the exact opposite of what your emotions want you to do. We are going to look at that in the Psychology of Trading chapter.
Remember: let winners run. Just like stops you need to know in advance the level where you will close out at a profit. Then let the trade happen. Don’t override yourself and let emotions force you to take a small profit. A classic mistake to avoid.
The trader puts on a trade and it almost stops out before rebounding. As soon as it is slightly in the money they spook and cut out, instead of letting it run to their original take profit. Do not do this.

Entering positions with limit orders

That covers exiting a position but how about getting into one?
Take profits can also be left speculatively to enter a position. Sometimes referred to as “bids” (buy orders) or “offers” (sell orders). Imagine the price is 1.1250 and the recent low is 1.1205.
You might wish to leave a bid around 1.2010 to enter a long position, if the market reaches that price. This way you don’t need to sit at the computer and wait.
Again, typically traders will use tech analysis to identify attractive levels. Again - other traders will cluster with your orders. Just like the stop loss we need to bake that in.
So this time if we know everyone is going to buy around the recent low of 1.1205 we might leave the take profit bit a little bit above there at 1.1210 to ensure it gets done. Sure it costs 5 more pips but how mad would you be if the low was 1.1207 and then it rallied a hundred points and you didn’t have the trade on?!
There are two more methods that traders often use for entering a position.
Scaling in is one such technique. Let’s imagine that you think we are in a long-term bulltrend for AUDUSD but experiencing a brief retracement. You want to take a total position of 500,000 AUD and don’t have a strong view on the current price action.
You might therefore leave a series of five bids of 100,000. As the price moves lower each one gets hit. The nice thing about scaling in is it reduces pressure on you to pick the perfect level. Of course the risk is that not all your orders get hit before the price moves higher and you have to trade at-market.
Pyramiding is the second technique. Pyramiding is for take profits what a trailing stop loss is to regular stops. It is especially common for momentum traders.

Pyramiding into a position means buying more as it goes in your favour
Again let’s imagine we’re bullish AUDUSD and want to take a position of 500,000 AUD.
Here we add 100,000 when our first signal is reached. Then we add subsequent clips of 100,000 when the trade moves in our favour. We are waiting for confirmation that the move is correct.
Obviously this is quite nice as we humans love trading when it goes in our direction. However, the drawback is obvious: we haven’t had the full amount of risk on from the start of the trend.
You can see the attractions and drawbacks of both approaches. It is best to experiment and choose techniques that work for your own personal psychology as these will be the easiest for you to stick with and build a disciplined process around.

Risk:reward and win ratios

Be extremely skeptical of people who claim to win on 80% of trades. Most traders will win on roughly 50% of trades and lose on 50% of trades. This is why risk management is so important!
Once you start keeping a trading journal you’ll be able to see how the win/loss ratio looks for you. Until then, assume you’re typical and that every other trade will lose money.
If that is the case then you need to be sure you make more on the wins than you lose on the losses. You can see the effect of this below.

A combination of win % and risk:reward ratio determine if you are profitable
A typical rule of thumb is that a ratio of 1:3 works well for most traders.
That is, if you are prepared to risk 100 pips on your stop you should be setting a take profit at a level that would return you 300 pips.
One needn’t be religious about these numbers - 11 pips and 28 pips would be perfectly fine - but they are a guideline.
Again - you should still use technical analysis to find meaningful chart levels for both the stop and take profit. Don’t just blindly take your stop distance and do 3x the pips on the other side as your take profit. Use the ratio to set approximate targets and then look for a relevant resistance or support level in that kind of region.

Risk-adjusted returns

Not all returns are equal. Suppose you are examining the track record of two traders. Now, both have produced a return of 14% over the year. Not bad!
The first trader, however, made hundreds of small bets throughout the year and his cumulative PNL looked like the left image below.
The second trader made just one bet — he sold CADJPY at the start of the year — and his PNL looked like the right image below with lots of large drawdowns and volatility.
Would you rather have the first trading record or the second?
If you were investing money and betting on who would do well next year which would you choose? Of course all sensible people would choose the first trader. Yet if you look only at returns one cannot distinguish between the two. Both are up 14% at that point in time. This is where the Sharpe ratio helps .
A high Sharpe ratio indicates that a portfolio has better risk-adjusted performance. One cannot sensibly compare returns without considering the risk taken to earn that return.
If I can earn 80% of the return of another investor at only 50% of the risk then a rational investor should simply leverage me at 2x and enjoy 160% of the return at the same level of risk.
This is very important in the context of Execution Advisor algorithms (EAs) that are popular in the retail community. You must evaluate historic performance by its risk-adjusted return — not just the nominal return. Incidentally look at the Sharpe ratio of ones that have been live for a year or more ...
Otherwise an EA developer could produce two EAs: the first simply buys at 1000:1 leverage on January 1st ; and the second sells in the same manner. At the end of the year, one of them will be discarded and the other will look incredible. Its risk-adjusted return, however, would be abysmal and the odds of repeated success are similarly poor.

Sharpe ratio

The Sharpe ratio works like this:
  • It takes the average returns of your strategy;
  • It deducts from these the risk-free rate of return i.e. the rate anyone could have got by investing in US government bonds with very little risk;
  • It then divides this total return by its own volatility - the more smooth the return the higher and better the Sharpe, the more volatile the lower and worse the Sharpe.
For example, say the return last year was 15% with a volatility of 10% and US bonds are trading at 2%. That gives (15-2)/10 or a Sharpe ratio of 1.3. As a rule of thumb a Sharpe ratio of above 0.5 would be considered decent for a discretionary retail trader. Above 1 is excellent.
You don’t really need to know how to calculate Sharpe ratios. Good trading software will do this for you. It will either be available in the system by default or you can add a plug-in.

VAR

VAR is another useful measure to help with drawdowns. It stands for Value at Risk. Normally people will use 99% VAR (conservative) or 95% VAR (aggressive). Let’s say you’re long EURUSD and using 95% VAR. The system will look at the historic movement of EURUSD. It might spit out a number of -1.2%.

A 5% VAR of -1.2% tells you you should expect to lose 1.2% on 5% of days, whilst 95% of days should be better than that
This means it is expected that on 5 days out of 100 (hence the 95%) the portfolio will lose 1.2% or more. This can help you manage your capital by taking appropriately sized positions. Typically you would look at VAR across your portfolio of trades rather than trade by trade.
Sharpe ratios and VAR don’t give you the whole picture, though. Legendary fund manager, Howard Marks of Oaktree, notes that, while tools like VAR and Sharpe ratios are helpful and absolutely necessary, the best investors will also overlay their own judgment.
Investors can calculate risk metrics like VaR and Sharpe ratios (we use them at Oaktree; they’re the best tools we have), but they shouldn’t put too much faith in them. The bottom line for me is that risk management should be the responsibility of every participant in the investment process, applying experience, judgment and knowledge of the underlying investments.Howard Marks of Oaktree Capital
What he’s saying is don’t misplace your common sense. Do use these tools as they are helpful. However, you cannot fully rely on them. Both assume a normal distribution of returns. Whereas in real life you get “black swans” - events that should supposedly happen only once every thousand years but which actually seem to happen fairly often.
These outlier events are often referred to as “tail risk”. Don’t make the mistake of saying “well, the model said…” - overlay what the model is telling you with your own common sense and good judgment.

Coming up in part III

Available here
Squeezes and other risks
Market positioning
Bet correlation
Crap trades, timeouts and monthly limits

***
Disclaimer:This content is not investment advice and you should not place any reliance on it. The views expressed are the author's own and should not be attributed to any other person, including their employer.
submitted by getmrmarket to Forex [link] [comments]

Sucess Story

Started my journey in June when I turned 18, the legal age required to trade in Canada. Ever since I dedicated myself to the craft of trading I can say it has made me more disciplined in many aspects in my life. I had to come up with strategies to remove overtrading and that 9-5 mentality of trading everyday. It took me some time to realize that trading everyday exposes your equity to a high amount of risk no matter how good the setup looks. Fast forward to November life is great I am making 15,000 per month and I am a funded FTMO trader. This is a manifestation of my efforts and energy going into the trading career that I have birthed. I love my life soo much I am financially free and I can consistently generate profits from the forex market. I started trading live in September, September and October were net negative months but the month of October was the month when I made over 1000 dollars in a day, This post is mainly to inspire others to never give up. My future is going to be amazing by the time. Always stay focused and never quit on something that you cant go 3 hours without thinking about it.
submitted by Centual223 to Forex [link] [comments]

Former investment bank FX trader: Risk management part 3/3

Former investment bank FX trader: Risk management part 3/3
Welcome to the third and final part of this chapter.
Thank you all for the 100s of comments and upvotes - maybe this post will take us above 1,000 for this topic!
Keep any feedback or questions coming in the replies below.
Before you read this note, please start with Part I and then Part II so it hangs together and makes sense.
Part III
  • Squeezes and other risks
  • Market positioning
  • Bet correlation
  • Crap trades, timeouts and monthly limits

Squeezes and other risks

We are going to cover three common risks that traders face: events; squeezes, asymmetric bets.

Events

Economic releases can cause large short-term volatility. The most famous is Non Farm Payrolls, which is the most widely watched measure of US employment levels and affects the price of many instruments.On an NFP announcement currencies like EURUSD might jump (or drop) 100 pips no problem.
This is fine and there are trading strategies that one may employ around this but the key thing is to be aware of these releases.You can find economic calendars all over the internet - including on this site - and you need only check if there are any major releases each day or week.
For example, if you are trading off some intraday chart and scalping a few pips here and there it would be highly sensible to go into a known data release flat as it is pure coin-toss and not the reason for your trading. It only takes five minutes each day to plan for the day ahead so do not get caught out by this. Many retail traders get stopped out on such events when price volatility is at its peak.

Squeezes

Short squeezes bring a lot of danger and perhaps some opportunity.
The story of VW and Porsche is the best short squeeze ever. Throughout these articles we've used FX examples wherever possible but in this one instance the concept (which is also highly relevant in FX) is best illustrated with an historical lesson from a different asset class.
A short squeeze is when a participant ends up in a short position they are forced to cover. Especially when the rest of the market knows that this participant can be bullied into stopping out at terrible levels, provided the market can briefly drive the price into their pain zone.

There's a reason for the car, don't worry
Hedge funds had been shorting VW stock. However the amount of VW stock available to buy in the open market was actually quite limited. The local government owned a chunk and Porsche itself had bought and locked away around 30%. Neither of these would sell to the hedge-funds so a good amount of the stock was un-buyable at any price.
If you sell or short a stock you must be prepared to buy it back to go flat at some point.
To cut a long story short, Porsche bought a lot of call options on VW stock. These options gave them the right to purchase VW stock from banks at slightly above market price.
Eventually the banks who had sold these options realised there was no VW stock to go out and buy since the German government wouldn’t sell its allocation and Porsche wouldn’t either. If Porsche called in the options the banks were in trouble.
Porsche called in the options which forced the shorts to buy stock - at whatever price they could get it.
The price squeezed higher as those that were short got massively squeezed and stopped out. For one brief moment in 2008, VW was the world’s most valuable company. Shorts were burned hard.

Incredible event
Porsche apparently made $11.5 billion on the trade. The BBC described Porsche as “a hedge fund with a carmaker attached.”
If this all seems exotic then know that the same thing happens in FX all the time. If everyone in the market is talking about a key level in EURUSD being 1.2050 then you can bet the market will try to push through 1.2050 just to take out any short stops at that level. Whether it then rallies higher or fails and trades back lower is a different matter entirely.
This brings us on to the matter of crowded trades. We will look at positioning in more detail in the next section. Crowded trades are dangerous for PNL. If everyone believes EURUSD is going down and has already sold EURUSD then you run the risk of a short squeeze.
For additional selling to take place you need a very good reason for people to add to their position whereas a move in the other direction could force mass buying to cover their shorts.
A trading mentor when I worked at the investment bank once advised me:
Always think about which move would cause the maximum people the maximum pain. That move is precisely what you should be watching out for at all times.

Asymmetric losses

Also known as picking up pennies in front of a steamroller. This risk has caught out many a retail trader. Sometimes it is referred to as a "negative skew" strategy.
Ideally what you are looking for is asymmetric risk trade set-ups: that is where the downside is clearly defined and smaller than the upside. What you want to avoid is the opposite.
A famous example of this going wrong was the Swiss National Bank de-peg in 2012.
The Swiss National Bank had said they would defend the price of EURCHF so that it did not go below 1.2. Many people believed it could never go below 1.2 due to this. Many retail traders therefore opted for a strategy that some describe as ‘picking up pennies in front of a steam-roller’.
They would would buy EURCHF above the peg level and hope for a tiny rally of several pips before selling them back and keep doing this repeatedly. Often they were highly leveraged at 100:1 so that they could amplify the profit of the tiny 5-10 pip rally.
Then this happened.

Something that changed FX markets forever
The SNB suddenly did the unthinkable. They stopped defending the price. CHF jumped and so EURCHF (the number of CHF per 1 EUR) dropped to new lows very fast. Clearly, this trade had horrific risk : reward asymmetry: you risked 30% to make 0.05%.
Other strategies like naively selling options have the same result. You win a small amount of money each day and then spectacularly blow up at some point down the line.

Market positioning

We have talked about short squeezes. But how do you know what the market position is? And should you care?
Let’s start with the first. You should definitely care.
Let’s imagine the entire market is exceptionally long EURUSD and positioning reaches extreme levels. This makes EURUSD very vulnerable.
To keep the price going higher EURUSD needs to attract fresh buy orders. If everyone is already long and has no room to add, what can incentivise people to keep buying? The news flow might be good. They may believe EURUSD goes higher. But they have already bought and have their maximum position on.
On the flip side, if there’s an unexpected event and EURUSD gaps lower you will have the entire market trying to exit the position at the same time. Like a herd of cows running through a single doorway. Messy.
We are going to look at this in more detail in a later chapter, where we discuss ‘carry’ trades. For now this TRYJPY chart might provide some idea of what a rush to the exits of a crowded position looks like.

A carry trade position clear-out in action
Knowing if the market is currently at extreme levels of long or short can therefore be helpful.
The CFTC makes available a weekly report, which details the overall positions of speculative traders “Non Commercial Traders” in some of the major futures products. This includes futures tied to deliverable FX pairs such as EURUSD as well as products such as gold. The report is called “CFTC Commitments of Traders” ("COT").
This is a great benchmark. It is far more representative of the overall market than the proprietary ones offered by retail brokers as it covers a far larger cross-section of the institutional market.
Generally market participants will not pay a lot of attention to commercial hedgers, which are also detailed in the report. This data is worth tracking but these folks are simply hedging real-world transactions rather than speculating so their activity is far less revealing and far more noisy.
You can find the data online for free and download it directly here.

Raw format is kinda hard to work with

However, many websites will chart this for you free of charge and you may find it more convenient to look at it that way. Just google “CFTC positioning charts”.

But you can easily get visualisations
You can visually spot extreme positioning. It is extremely powerful.
Bear in mind the reports come out Friday afternoon US time and the report is a snapshot up to the prior Tuesday. That means it is a lagged report - by the time it is released it is a few days out of date. For longer term trades where you hold positions for weeks this is of course still pretty helpful information.
As well as the absolute level (is the speculative market net long or short) you can also use this to pick up on changes in positioning.
For example if bad news comes out how much does the net short increase? If good news comes out, the market may remain net short but how much did they buy back?
A lot of traders ask themselves “Does the market have this trade on?” The positioning data is a good method for answering this. It provides a good finger on the pulse of the wider market sentiment and activity.
For example you might say: “There was lots of noise about the good employment numbers in the US. However, there wasn’t actually a lot of position change on the back of it. Maybe everyone who wants to buy already has. What would happen now if bad news came out?”
In general traders will be wary of entering a crowded position because it will be hard to attract additional buyers or sellers and there could be an aggressive exit.
If you want to enter a trade that is showing extreme levels of positioning you must think carefully about this dynamic.

Bet correlation

Retail traders often drastically underestimate how correlated their bets are.
Through bitter experience, I have learned that a mistake in position correlation is the root of some of the most serious problems in trading. If you have eight highly correlated positions, then you are really trading one position that is eight times as large.
Bruce Kovner of hedge fund, Caxton Associates
For example, if you are trading a bunch of pairs against the USD you will end up with a simply huge USD exposure. A single USD-trigger can ruin all your bets. Your ideal scenario — and it isn’t always possible — would be to have a highly diversified portfolio of bets that do not move in tandem.
Look at this chart. Inverted USD index (DXY) is green. AUDUSD is orange. EURUSD is blue.

Chart from TradingView
So the whole thing is just one big USD trade! If you are long AUDUSD, long EURUSD, and short DXY you have three anti USD bets that are all likely to work or fail together.
The more diversified your portfolio of bets are, the more risk you can take on each.
There’s a really good video, explaining the benefits of diversification from Ray Dalio.
A systematic fund with access to an investable universe of 10,000 instruments has more opportunity to make a better risk-adjusted return than a trader who only focuses on three symbols. Diversification really is the closest thing to a free lunch in finance.
But let’s be pragmatic and realistic. Human retail traders don’t have capacity to run even one hundred bets at a time. More realistic would be an average of 2-3 trades on simultaneously. So what can be done?
For example:
  • You might diversify across time horizons by having a mix of short-term and long-term trades.
  • You might diversify across asset classes - trading some FX but also crypto and equities.
  • You might diversify your trade generation approach so you are not relying on the same indicators or drivers on each trade.
  • You might diversify your exposure to the market regime by having some trades that assume a trend will continue (momentum) and some that assume we will be range-bound (carry).
And so on. Basically you want to scan your portfolio of trades and make sure you are not putting all your eggs in one basket. If some trades underperform others will perform - assuming the bets are not correlated - and that way you can ensure your overall portfolio takes less risk per unit of return.
The key thing is to start thinking about a portfolio of bets and what each new trade offers to your existing portfolio of risk. Will it diversify or amplify a current exposure?

Crap trades, timeouts and monthly limits

One common mistake is to get bored and restless and put on crap trades. This just means trades in which you have low conviction.
It is perfectly fine not to trade. If you feel like you do not understand the market at a particular point, simply choose not to trade.
Flat is a position.
Do not waste your bullets on rubbish trades. Only enter a trade when you have carefully considered it from all angles and feel good about the risk. This will make it far easier to hold onto the trade if it moves against you at any point. You actually believe in it.
Equally, you need to set monthly limits. A standard limit might be a 10% account balance stop per month. At that point you close all your positions immediately and stop trading till next month.

Be strict with yourself and walk away
Let’s assume you started the year with $100k and made 5% in January so enter Feb with $105k balance. Your stop is therefore 10% of $105k or $10.5k . If your account balance dips to $94.5k ($105k-$10.5k) then you stop yourself out and don’t resume trading till March the first.
Having monthly calendar breaks is nice for another reason. Say you made a load of money in January. You don’t want to start February feeling you are up 5% or it is too tempting to avoid trading all month and protect the existing win. Each month and each year should feel like a clean slate and an independent period.
Everyone has trading slumps. It is perfectly normal. It will definitely happen to you at some stage. The trick is to take a break and refocus. Conserve your capital by not trading a lot whilst you are on a losing streak. This period will be much harder for you emotionally and you’ll end up making suboptimal decisions. An enforced break will help you see the bigger picture.
Put in place a process before you start trading and then it’ll be easy to follow and will feel much less emotional. Remember: the market doesn’t care if you win or lose, it is nothing personal.
When your head has cooled and you feel calm you return the next month and begin the task of building back your account balance.

That's a wrap on risk management

Thanks for taking time to read this three-part chapter on risk management. I hope you enjoyed it. Do comment in the replies if you have any questions or feedback.
Remember: the most important part of trading is not making money. It is not losing money. Always start with that principle. I hope these three notes have provided some food for thought on how you might approach risk management and are of practical use to you when trading. Avoiding mistakes is not a sexy tagline but it is an effective and reliable way to improve results.
Next up I will be writing about an exciting topic I think many traders should look at rather differently: news trading. Please follow on here to receive notifications and the broad outline is below.
News Trading Part I
  • Introduction
  • Why use the economic calendar
  • Reading the economic calendar
  • Knowing what's priced in
  • Surveys
  • Interest rates
  • First order thinking vs second order thinking
News Trading Part II
  • Preparing for quantitative and qualitative releases
  • Data surprise index
  • Using recent events to predict future reactions
  • Buy the rumour, sell the fact
  • The mysterious 'position trim' effect
  • Reversals
  • Some key FX releases
***

Disclaimer:This content is not investment advice and you should not place any reliance on it. The views expressed are the author's own and should not be attributed to any other person, including their employer.
submitted by getmrmarket to Forex [link] [comments]

Why forex isn't the Holy Grail (?)

I don't understand why people say it's impossible to become rich in short time with forex.
Let's assume we have a strategy that has a winrate of 50% with a r of 1:1.25 (not so strong or impossible, right?). We are daytrading it and we can open 60 operations per month. We risk 2% (a conservative approach) per trade of initial capital of the year, starting with 5000. With these numbers we are gaining 15% each month, let's lower that down to 10% because yes. Within a year we can make 120% of initial capital! Let's lower that down to 100% because, again, yes.
After 8 years we would be more than millionaire.
If we could bring up that r to 1:1.5 we would be millionaire in 5 years (and billionaire in 12!!!!).
I don't understand why this is wrong, why people keep saying that trading isn't the Holy Grail. 1:1.25, 50% winrate is the lowest working strategy I could imagine and still would be extraordinary even though I've lowered that down even more.
What's wrong with this? What am I missing?
P.s I'm backtesting a strategy that is doing 45% winrate with 1:2 r and 80+ possible operations per month. I feel like I'm going to eat golden nuggets in few years! Please roast me!
submitted by Scrotus_8 to Forex [link] [comments]

Want to Trade forex for a living? Read this.

Think of it like a really extreme freelance career, working for tips at a seasonal bar or restaurant. Every day, week, month, you have to put in the work to build your revenue stream. One Friday, you could pull in $800. Memorial Day weekend, $2000. Then for all of June to August, $50 a week, or worse, you spend more on bus fare just to get to work.
Same for trading. First you have to build some kind of personal track record. No one else needs to see it. No one else cares. It's just for you to know what you are actually capable of. You can't plan a monthly budget on an income you haven't proven yet.
Calculate your rock bottom monthly expenses. Rent, transportation, bills, food. No entertainment or other discretionary spending.
Compare to your hypothetical track record for trading. What's the worst month you had in a year? The best month? The average? How many months did you not make enough to pay your bills?
From that, figure out how much of a savings buffer you need, to afford that many months of bills, and no trading income (or worse, trading LOSSES).
Normal budget planning recommends 2-3 months of living expenses saved, plus an emergency fund. For volatile jobs, I'd say you need at least 2x that much. I've heard of some old school traders who only saw $0 or losses for 2 years straight. There's this penny stock trader guy Ross, who sells Warrior Trading education courses. In 2017 (?) he did a challenge where he traded $500 up toward a goal of $500,000 in a year -- he posted account updates (as far as one can trust them), and showed that he reached $335k by the end of the year, but had SIX MONTHS of zero to negative returns in the middle of his year. In 2012-2014, volatility died, and a lot of traders couldn't hack it in those conditions. With price movement dead for two years, how would you adjust for the lack of trading opportunities and income?
Your living costs need to be as low as possible, and your trading income needs to be sufficiently high, so that even your low months are consistently able to cover your bills. If your living cost is currently $2500 a month, and you have a $50,000 job, then one example might be to downsize your life (take on roommates, whatever) to reduce your cost down to $1500/mo and aim for a trading account size combined with personal trading method that gets you an annual range of $50k-$100k. That way, even in a bad year when you only make $25k, you'll still be able to pay rent. And just as they recommend for people who make good tips, save the extra income from any good month or year, until you have that huge safety cushion to live off.
It sucks immensely to trade under pressure when you don't have rent money. It's one of the big rules -- never trade with money you can't afford to lose.
If that all sounds too unglamorous, keep a part-time to full-time job, and trade in the evenings/plan your setups on the weekend to juice your income. Keeping a base income means covering your bases (so long as the job market is good), leaving you to trade stress free. Even if you blow a $1000 account, hopefully you can build that back up in a few months of saving from your normal job.
By the numbers, 93% of new traders quit or fail within 5 years. And only less than 1% of traders are profitable after expenses, per year. That means anyone who makes more than $0, so there's a long way to reach an income you can live on. Work towards being that successful guy, but make plans to survive the initial X number of years where you haven't yet proven your ability to be that guy.
submitted by brycewit to Forex [link] [comments]

Gold pays the debts back. 10.11.2020

Gold pays the debts back. 10.11.2020
Many bullish factors are already price in the XAUUSD. The hope for the global economic recovery as vaccines are being developed encourages speculators to exit gold longs. Let us discuss gold prospects and make up a XAUUSD trading plan.

Monthly gold fundamental forecast

Gold is rolling down, and my forecast comes true. Just a few days ago, I recommended selling gold on the rebound from the resistance at $1965. Gold has been more than 5% down, and one could have made quite a lot of money on this strategy. Most of the positive factors have already been priced in the XAUUSD. The good news about COVID-19 vaccines has crashed the gold prices.
Gold trades could face the same situation as it was in 2011. 9 years ago, the global economy was recovering after the recession; massive fiscal and monetary stimuli weakened the world’s major currencies and fueled up inflation expectations, which was a bullish factor for the XAUUSD. However, consumer prices grew very slowly, and the gold uptrend broke down. In 2020, the hopes for the expansion of financial aid to at least $2 trillion encouraged the gold bulls to go ahead. Nonetheless, the divided congress and the information about vaccines set the gold buyers back.
The gold uptrend seemed to base on a strong foundation. The monetary stimuli now are the biggest ever, which boosts the central banks’ balance sheets, weakening the global currencies and increasing the volume of negative-yielding bonds up to a record high of $17.05 trillion.

Dynamics of central banks’ balance sheets


Source: Wall Street Journal

Dynamics of volumes of bonds with negative yields


Source: Bloomberg
Nonetheless, the situation cannot be stable by its nature, and it is going to change.
First, grate money supplies provided by central banks turned out into a liquidity trap. Additional monetary stimuli won’t be as effective as they used to be. It is evident from the reaction of the Australian dollar and the British pound to the monetary easing performed by the RBA and the BoE. These currencies strengthened, though they should have weakened under normal conditions. Regulators are more likely to change the structure of the QE rather than the volumes. The balance sheets should not increase as fast as before.
Second, Joe Biden’s victory along with the divided Congress lowers the chances of a massive fiscal stimulus. The gold bulls’ hopes for the reflationary policy, which could have been performed along with the presence of the ‘blue wave’, haven’t met the reality. That is why the speculators are exiting the gold longs.
Finally, if the information about the effectiveness of the OCVID-19 vaccine is true, the global economic recovery will drive the global bond market rates up and encourage investors to sell off the XAUUSD. Gold uptrend might recover only if the dollar is weak, but that will hardly happen soon. The dollar should weaken against the euro only provided the EU cancels the restrictions.

Monthly gold trading plan

I recommend holding down the shorts entered at level $1965. It will be relevant to add up to the sell positions if the price fails to break out the resistance at $1900 and $1915 or tests the supports at $1875 and $1860.
For more information follow the link to the website of the LiteForex
https://www.liteforex.com/blog/analysts-opinions/gold-pays-the-debts-back-10112020/?uid=285861726&cid=62423
submitted by Maxvelgus to Finance_analytics [link] [comments]

Yen places its opponent in check. Analysis as of 04.11.2020

Yen places its opponent in check. Analysis as of 04.11.2020

Monthly fundamental forecast for yen

While the greenback is waiting for the election's final results, trading currency cross rates may be worth considering. The US political landscape will undoubtedly affect most currencies, but the pandemic remains a weightier factor in Forex pricing in the medium and long terms. The strategies based on the divergence in epidemiological situations, economic growth, and monetary policies continue to yield profits. Another confirmation is the realization of the targets at 122.9 and 121.8 set in mid-October for shorts in the EURJPY.
COVID-19 hit Japan less than the eurozone: in terms of Coronavirus cases per 100,000, Japan is one of the countries that tackle the pandemic most efficiently, along with China, Taiwan, and South Korea. The situation in Belgium, Spain, and Italy looks gloomy, on the contrary.

Recession and pandemic


Source: Financial Times.
As a result, Europe is forced to introduce new restrictions, which will cut the eurozone's Q4 GDP by 2.3%, according to Financial Times. Thus, a double recession is certainly in the air. The organization of economic development and cooperation expects that the currency block's economy will reduce 7.9% in 2020, i.e., twice as much as during the previous global crisis. I dare suppose that the second wave may even downgrade those forecasts.
The BoJ expects that the Japanese GDP will fall by 5.5% by the end of the 2020/2021 fiscal year in March. Japan's economic loss doesn't look as significant as the eurozone's since the efficiency of anti-pandemic measures in Asia is higher than in Europe.

GDP dynamics

Source: Financial Times.
Christine Lagarde is sure the ECB will expand a monetary stimulus package in December as the coronavirus is spreading fast across Europe. Haruhiko Kuroda and his colleagues are ready to take action if necessary, but the BoJ's Head has not seen such a necessity so far. Both regulators got caught in a liquidity trap where softer monetary policies do not have any positive effect. Both agree to play currency wars, but the ECB's intentions are manifest, and the euro is therefore falling faster than other G10 currencies.

Monthly trading plan for EURJPY

The situation may seriously change soon: vaccines' development will support the global economic recovery and international trade, which is positive news for the euro. The European countries will lift restrictions, and Christine Lagarde's hints about QE expansion will remain mere hints. According to Governor of the Austrian National Bank Robert Holzmann, there is no point in increasing buy volumes as the inflation won't speed up anyway. Instead, a change in the QE program's structure must be in focus.
This scenario looks too optimistic, though. But why not hope for the best and use the EURJPY's drawdown to 120.65 for long-term buying?
For more information follow the link to the website of the LiteForex
https://www.liteforex.com/blog/analysts-opinions/yen-places-its-opponent-in-check-analysis-as-of-04112020/?uid=285861726&cid=62423
submitted by Maxvelgus to Finance_analytics [link] [comments]

Here's some trading advice from a fellow trader

I currently manage around half a million dollars and have been trading for 6+ years with 3 years of consistent profitability. Paid for my trading lessons the hard way by losing a lot of money at first. Here's some advice that might help you.
1) Treat trading like a business. I know you probably heard this 100 times before but I feel like I should emphasize this point. Majority of traders overestimate their ability to make money and underestimate their risk exposure.
2) Think long term. The more complex your trading system is, the less freedom it has in terms of flexibility because of too many variables in your analysis. So, keep your trading system simple.
3) Do not rationalize or predict the market. Do not look for comfort in your strategy. In fact, do the reverse. Find comfort in the thought that markets are chaotic and there's always a good chance of you losing a lot of money. This should keep you up on your toes and controls your greed during a profitable streak (You are not a money printing machine, trust me. )
4) Every trade you open should be assumed as a loss. This is very important in terms of having a healthy mindset towards managing risk. I never open a position based on how much money I can make. I do it based on how much I can afford to lose in this particular trade.
5) Biggest mistake I have observed while working with other traders is not doing their homework. If you don't plan your trades before the day even began, then you will develop a mindset of chasing the market which will lead to your downfall. Which brings me to my next point
6) Maintain three things - a) your daily trading notes that you read before you begin trading b) market observation notes which includes particular strategies and observations in specific markets and c) a full fledged trading journal where you record everything you traded. Always remember that majority of your trading work is done when you're not trading.
7) Journaling is the most important and also most neglected part of trading and most traders, including some very good traders do it in a wrong way. How do I know that?
Let me ask you something : Tell me about what kind of trading setups were the most and least profitable in the last 100 trades. Explain them to me in detail including your analysis and opinion on what you think might have happened.
If you can answer this in detail and with specific examples from your last 100 trades then I know you have a good journaling habit. If you cannot , then it's time to improve on your record keeping. Remember that your journals are the only way you can guarantee that you will grow as a trader.
8) Remember this no matter what - Not having a position in the market is itself a position if you know what you are doing. There's no need for you to always trade all day everyday and try to make money. In fact, I can guarantee you that markets will not always behave according to your trading system and during those times trying to "find a needle in a haystack " type of behavior is reckless and will take an emotional toll on your mind. Just sit on the sidelines if the market isn't moving according to your system.
9) There's no thing as overbought or oversold scenarios especially in forex. Heaving a bearish bias because the market moved up by a lot is just ridiculous and most likely guarantee that you miss out on bullish scenarios. If you start developing a bearish bias after a huge bullish move then you better have a damn good reason for it instead of just saying " It moved up by a lot so I'm expecting a reversal".
10) This one is a personal opinion. Always remember to take breaks and relax during the weekends. Managing stress while maintaining performance is a huge part of the job and I don't want you to burn out after a few months of serious trading everyday. Maintain a decent social life outside of trading to keep your sanity intact. Get some hobbies. Your health and well being is very important to your long term performance as a trader so don't neglect it.
submitted by mechz21 to Forex [link] [comments]

New to Trading? Here's some tips

So there seems to be a lot of new people on this sub. And makes sense if you have questions a lot of time you'll turn to reddit for the answers (I know I do). Well here are some tips that I think would benefit new traders.
  1. Don't trade ANY Euro pairs. Look I know it's the most traded pair it goes up and down really fast and there's so much potential for you to make money. Turns out there's even more for you to lose money. It's way too volatile specially if you don't know what you're doing. EUUSD is the worst offender.
  2. Trade the Daily. Might think you're cool looking at charts every x amount of times during the day. You get to tell your friends and family that you trade all day and they might be impressed at what you're doing but unless you have some years under you stick to the daily. There's less noise. You can see clearer trends and when you don't stare at the screen all day you're less emotional therefore a more effective trader. I only look at the chart 15 minutes a day to either enter close or manage my trades. Whatever happens when I'm gone is what happens.
  3. There is no holy grail indicator Look for it all you want. It doesn't exist. There are good indicators. There are bad indicators. There are some indicators that are so broken if you do the opposite of what they're intended for you'll actually make a profit. But the fact remains that there's no perfect one. Stop looking. What you should be looking for is an indicator that fits with your strategy.
  4. What currencies to pick. I actually never see this brought up. The notion in forex is that all pairs can be traded equally. To a certain extent that's not false. But until you get the hang of it stick to a strict trading diet. Look for pairs that trend a lot. Duh look for the trend I can hear you say. When I say trend I don't mean a couple of days or weeks. I mean a couple of months. Half a year. Pairs that do that have a higher tendency to stick with one direction for a while. That's where you make your money. An easy way to identify those pairs as well is putting together a volatile currency (USD) with a less volatile one(JPY).
  5. USE YOUR SL Trust me even if not putting a SL has netted you all kinds of gains eventually the market will turn around and bite you. With no safety net you'll lose most if not all your profit. The best offense is a good defense.
  6. How to pick your TP and SL level. Most new traders care so much about that. I put it near the bottom because in my opinion you should know everything listed first. This is my opinion and I use it for my strategy I use the ATR(average true range) indicator. It's a really helpful tool that helps you identify the range at which the candles will either rise or fall. Obviously you want to set your TP inside of that range and your SL slightly outside of it.
  7. Lot sizes. Everyone has a different story about how they pick their lot size. The general consensus is don't risk over 2% of your account. But I'm a simple man and I can't be bothered to figure out what my risk is every single time. So what I do is I put $0.10 for every $100 I have on the account. I then assign $300(minimum) to each pair. That's $0.30 per pair. It's easy to remember. 10 cent for every $100. If you're able to blow $100 with $0.10 then you probably shouldn't trade.
  8. How to avoid reversals. Tbh you can't. There's no way to predict the future so eventually you'll get hit by one. What you can do however is minimize the blow. How I do it is for every pair I take two trades. If you remember in the previous tip is said I do about$0.30 per pair well I divide it 2:1. I take one trade with a TP(2) and one without (1). If my TP is hit I pocket that amount and if the trend keeps going in my direction I make even more. If the trend decides to end or reverses my losses are minimal because at least I kept half.
  9. There is NO right way to trade. Stop listening to people telling the best way to trade is fundamentals or naked charts of to use some specific indicator. There are no right way to do this. It's as flexible and unlimited as your imagination. I personally use indicators but if that's not your thing do YOU! Just remember to manage your trades properly and be level headed when trading. Hell if your trading strategy is flipping a coin with proper trade management you'd probably make some money (don't quote me on that).
  10. Trade money you're willing to lose Don't trade your rent money.
That's all I have for now. If anyone sees this and wants to add more feel free. Hope this helps someone.
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How to Make 10% Per Month in Profits Trading Forex - YouTube How to trade 10% monthly and above in Forex Trading - Tagalog 2200+ Pips Monthly Profit ! Forex Profitable Trading Strategy ! Urdu hindi The Trade Risk - Evan Medeiros - How To Trade The Monthly ... Exact Trading - Monthly Forex trading technique against the EURO/USD

Long Term Trading Strategy for Forex. There are many reasons why I believe a long term trading strategy will set you up for success. More so than using smaller time frames to trade, and I will get into several of those reasons within this article. Here you can see a funny video about trading levels. I lay out a few of those reasons in a light-hearted tone in my Scalp vs Swing Article. This ... The 1000 Pips forex trading strategy is about seeing what Is happening in the larger timeframes and then taking a trade based on those setups in the larger timeframe. This strategy involves muti-timeframe trading and I will explain in more detail further below. Timeframes: weekly or monthly. Currency pairs: any. Forex Indicators: none This strategy is quite simple and based only on solid technical trading principles that the big institutions and interbank Forex traders also trade on. The classic indicators and patterns on the monthly timeframe work very well because so many people are trading by them and there is no single player that can control the market to that degree to cause fake-outs on the monthly chart. In contrast ... Compared to the Forex 1-hour trading strategy, or even those with lower time-frames, there is less market noise involved with daily charts. Such charts could give you over 100 pips a day due to their longer timeframe, which has the potential to result in some of the best Forex trades. Daily trade signals can be more reliable than lower timeframes, and the potential for profit could also be ... The forex 1-2-3 price action pattern trading is most simple yet powerful forex strategy you’ll ever find. It work best when the patterns follow the direction of trend (it also works against the trend). The pattern is also easy to identify on the chart and you can find it every day. I am sharing the simplest strategy for stress free day trading, I have ever seen anywhere else Indicators. SMA 5,0; BB (Optional) Time Required - Just 15 minutes daily after D1 close when new candle starts. Avoid. Lower timeframe charts, even H4 is not reliable. Risk - Do not take positions more than 5% of account value and do not take multiple positions of same currency (Max 2), even setup is ... Forex trading requires putting together multiple factors to formulate a trading strategy that works for you. There are countless strategies that can be followed, however, understanding and being ...

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How to Make 10% Per Month in Profits Trading Forex - YouTube

We discuss how to trade on the monthly chart by reviewing a recent trade we had in XLU. This video walks through our decision-making process throughout the t... As by way of compariosn, I now review the earlier 15 minute time frame technique against the monthly time frame. The video explains that for people who want ... Latest Forex Strategy, No chance of loss, Unbelievable Forex trading strategies, Always Win , If you dont know Urdu are Hindi Click here and Check this strategy in English. https://goo.gl/Q2KgPu. Guide strategy in Forex Trading How to get consistent 10% result or above in Forex Trading. Step by step guide on how to perform the strategy. How to calculate and start the lot size. http://www.learncurrencytradingonline.com This video discusses one of the questions we are most frequently asked which is How to make 10% trading Forex per m...

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